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Portafolio.co - Agroindustria

Ceden los precios de todos los tipos de cafés

Feb 18 2016
En el 2015 las caídas fueron de entre el 2 y el 5,8 por ciento.

El mercado del café llegó en enero al nivel más bajo en dos años, debido principalmente al descenso de los precios del robusta, informó Robério Oliveira Silva, director de la Organización Internacional del Café (OIC).

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Gremio cafetero pagará por todas las pasillas del café

Feb 16 2016
La medida se tomó para hacer frente al fenómeno de ‘El Niño’ y proteger los ingresos de los caficultores.

Como una medida para aliviar el impacto económico del fenómeno de ‘El Niño’ para los productores, desde este martes la Federación Nacional de Cafeteros pagará el total de la pasilla.

Para cumplirlo, el gremio cafetero publicará diariamente el precio de referencia de la pasilla.

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Por cuenta de TLC entrarán 65.972 toneladas de arroz

Feb 15 2016
Las utilidades que genera este negocio comercial están destinándose a la modernización y competitividad del sector.

Un total de 65.972 toneladas de arroz entrarán durante este primer semestre, como resultado de la subasta que da el derecho a importar a Colombia este cereal estadounidense, con cero arancel.

Se sabe que entre abril y junio hay una relativa baja oferta del cereal que se cosecha en el país, por lo que este volumen entra a suplir la posible escasez que llegue a presentarse.

Por otra parte, evita que esta llegue para la cosecha nacional del grano, que empieza a recogerse en el mes de julio.

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The Economist: The Americas

Argentina’s president without a plan

Dec 3 2020

IN DEATH, as in life, Diego Armando Maradona represented his country to the full. The funeral of Argentina’s most famous footballer on November 26th was as passionate and chaotic as his country’s affairs (see Obituary). In defiance of his own government’s health rules, President Alberto Fernández ordered that Mr Maradona’s coffin lie in state in the Casa Rosada, the presidential palace. Like the president, El Diego was a lifelong supporter of Peronism, Argentina’s populist-nationalist movement. When the wake was curtailed, with thousands of fans queuing, pandemonium ensued.

Mr Fernández’s craving for popularity by association is a sign of his weakness. The funerary disorder extends to the economy, too. A social democrat, the president took office a year ago, at the head of an uneasy Peronist coalition in which much power lies with his vice-president, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner (no relation), a leftist who ruled from 2007 to 2015. Within three months, the pandemic struck. Mr Fernández was quick to impose a lockdown, which brought a surge in his approval rating, but which delayed rather than prevented a severe outbreak of covid-19. Argentina is among the top ten countries for recorded deaths as a proportion of the population. Only now is the lockdown being eased. Mr Fernández’s popularity is below its starting point.

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Oil-rich Alberta seeks ways to go green

Dec 3 2020

A YEAR AGO, when Canada’s government promised to end net emissions of greenhouse gases by 2050, Jason Kenney, Alberta’s Conservative premier, erupted. The government’s ideas were a “fantasy plan for a mythical country”, he said. He scoffed at the “California-style pieties” of the Liberals who govern Canada. They imagine that people in poor countries like India “are all going to be driving Teslas 15 years from now”, Mr Kenney said. In fact, “they want to stop burning cow dung”.

The premier’s fusillade was in defence of Alberta’s oil industry, which has made the province’s residents Canada’s richest citizens. But it has lately suffered setbacks, most of which are more damaging than the Liberals’ nefarious net-zero plans. Oil prices have yet to recover from a slump that began in 2014. Environmental activists have singled out Alberta’s oil sands as an especially dirty source of crude. The thick bitumen they contain requires more energy, and money, to extract and refine than lighter oils do. Investment in the province’s oil and gas sector plunged between 2014 and 2019 to C$26bn ($19bn), around 6% of GDP (see chart). The covid-19 pandemic has made matters worse. The provincial unemployment rate of 10.7% is now among the highest in Canada.

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The Movimiento San Isidro challenges Cuba’s regime

Dec 3 2020

THE FRONT door of Damas 855, a ramshackle building in San Isidro, a poor neighbourhood of Havana, snapped like a wishbone when security agents charged through it on the evening of November 26th. The lock and chain tumbled to the ground. The agents, dressed in medical gowns, arrested 14 people (their pretext was that one of the residents had violated a covid-19 testing protocol). They had locked themselves in for eight days to protest against the arrest of Denis Solís, a young rapper who had been accused of disrespecting authority and sentenced to eight months in prison. A few of the Damas 855 denizens were on a hunger-and-thirst strike. Police cars took the detainees away. Facebook, YouTube and Instagram went down on most of the island for about an hour. Connections have been spotty since.

To defenders of Cuba’s 62-year-old revolution, the adherents of Movimiento San Isidro (MSI) are reprobates. On Twitter the country’s president, Miguel Díaz-Canel, called it an “imperial show to destroy our identity and subjugate us again”. A photo of President Donald Trump accompanied the tweet. State media echoed the message.

Some Cubans take a kinder view of the movement, which includes artists, scholars, journalists, rappers, poets and scientists who advocate freer expression and more democracy than the communist regime allows. Its...