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Portafolio.co - Agroindustria

Ceden los precios de todos los tipos de cafés

Feb 18 2016
En el 2015 las caídas fueron de entre el 2 y el 5,8 por ciento.

El mercado del café llegó en enero al nivel más bajo en dos años, debido principalmente al descenso de los precios del robusta, informó Robério Oliveira Silva, director de la Organización Internacional del Café (OIC).

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Gremio cafetero pagará por todas las pasillas del café

Feb 16 2016
La medida se tomó para hacer frente al fenómeno de ‘El Niño’ y proteger los ingresos de los caficultores.

Como una medida para aliviar el impacto económico del fenómeno de ‘El Niño’ para los productores, desde este martes la Federación Nacional de Cafeteros pagará el total de la pasilla.

Para cumplirlo, el gremio cafetero publicará diariamente el precio de referencia de la pasilla.

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Por cuenta de TLC entrarán 65.972 toneladas de arroz

Feb 15 2016
Las utilidades que genera este negocio comercial están destinándose a la modernización y competitividad del sector.

Un total de 65.972 toneladas de arroz entrarán durante este primer semestre, como resultado de la subasta que da el derecho a importar a Colombia este cereal estadounidense, con cero arancel.

Se sabe que entre abril y junio hay una relativa baja oferta del cereal que se cosecha en el país, por lo que este volumen entra a suplir la posible escasez que llegue a presentarse.

Por otra parte, evita que esta llegue para la cosecha nacional del grano, que empieza a recogerse en el mes de julio.

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The Economist: The Americas

A pipeline through historically native land has sparked protests in Canada

Feb 20 2020

“STOP THE INVASION! No pipelines on stolen native land!” So chanted dozens of protesters on a chilly afternoon this week in Vancouver. With placards in hand, they blocked traffic on a busy thoroughfare, doing their part to “shut down Canada”. That has become the rallying cry against the Coastal GasLink pipeline, a C$6.6bn ($5bn) project which will transport natural gas 670km (420 miles) across British Columbia to the Pacific coast, where a liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant is under construction.

The pipeline is an “invasion”, detractors say, because about a quarter of its route passes through land traditionally belonging to the Wet’suwet’en, a First Nations people. Since early February, when police broke up a blockade (with an injunction to do so) local disputes have escalated to national unrest. Allies of the Wet’suwet’en have organised copycat demonstrations far away from the pipeline itself.

None of this has scuppered the plans, but it has disrupted the economy and embarrassed the Liberal government. Canadian National Railway (CN) shut down lines in the east of the country and temporarily laid off about 450 workers; Via Rail, a passenger service, is doing the same to nearly 1,000. Food, heating fuel, farm exports and commodities are gridlocked. Cars and ships have been unable to get through bridges, ports and the...

An interview with Uruguay’s president-elect, Luis Lacalle Pou

Feb 20 2020

AT HIS CAMPAIGN headquarters on Artigas Boulevard, named after Uruguay’s founding hero, the man who hopes to be its next one was energised. Luis Lacalle Pou, the country’s conservative president-elect, is 46 years old but looks younger, with floppy brown hair, no jacket and sleeves rolled up. Days ahead of his swearing-in on March 1st, in an interview with The Economist, Mr Lacalle Pou set out a wide range of plans, from relaxing immigration rules to cutting public spending. But what obsessed him most of all was tackling a recent surge in crime (see chart). He lamented that just down the road were “no-go areas” overrun with violence. “It’s time to take back the streets,” he said, “by force if need be.”

The first step was to take back power. Last November, in a run-off, Mr Lacalle Pou narrowly defeated Daniel Martínez, the candidate of the Broad Front, a leftist coalition that had ruled Uruguay for 15 years. (The last president from Mr Lacalle Pou’s National Party was his father, in the 1990s.) The Broad Front had maintained economic and constitutional stability, and liberalised marijuana use and same-sex marriage. But it also presided over sharp rises in public employment, the fiscal deficit and violent crime. The homicide rate in Uruguay, a traditionally safe country of about 3.5m, shot up by 46% in 2018, to...

“What is Peronism?”

Feb 13 2020

ON FEBRUARY 3RD Argentina’s new Peronist president, Alberto Fernández, joined Angela Merkel for dinner at the German chancellery in Berlin. According to press reports, Mrs Merkel asked her guest a question: “What is Peronism? I don’t understand. Are you on the left or the right?” Bello imagines a conversation that might have followed.

Mr Fernández laughed. He was used to foreigners not knowing much about Argentina besides Evita, tango and hyperinflation. But something about Mrs Merkel suggested that she was only feigning ignorance. “Let me explain,” said Mr Fernández cautiously. “First of all, we’re not populists. That was an invention of Mauricio Macri, my neo-liberal predecessor. We don’t just stir up the masses.”

“Really?” asked Mrs Merkel, sounding unconvinced.

“Really. I’m a social democrat,” the president insisted. “The base of Peronism is the trade unions and the poor, whom we always look after. But we also have the industrialists behind us. They liked General Juan Perón’s protectionism 75 years ago and they like it today. And we have the pope.”

“As always, Perón himself put it best,” Mr Fernández continued. “In 1972 he told a journalist: ‘Look, in Argentina, 30% are Radicals…30% are conservatives and a similar amount Socialists.’ ‘So where are the Peronists?’ asked the journalist. ‘Ah,’ replied...