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Portafolio.co - Agroindustria

Ceden los precios de todos los tipos de cafés

Feb 18 2016
En el 2015 las caídas fueron de entre el 2 y el 5,8 por ciento.

El mercado del café llegó en enero al nivel más bajo en dos años, debido principalmente al descenso de los precios del robusta, informó Robério Oliveira Silva, director de la Organización Internacional del Café (OIC).

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Gremio cafetero pagará por todas las pasillas del café

Feb 16 2016
La medida se tomó para hacer frente al fenómeno de ‘El Niño’ y proteger los ingresos de los caficultores.

Como una medida para aliviar el impacto económico del fenómeno de ‘El Niño’ para los productores, desde este martes la Federación Nacional de Cafeteros pagará el total de la pasilla.

Para cumplirlo, el gremio cafetero publicará diariamente el precio de referencia de la pasilla.

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Por cuenta de TLC entrarán 65.972 toneladas de arroz

Feb 15 2016
Las utilidades que genera este negocio comercial están destinándose a la modernización y competitividad del sector.

Un total de 65.972 toneladas de arroz entrarán durante este primer semestre, como resultado de la subasta que da el derecho a importar a Colombia este cereal estadounidense, con cero arancel.

Se sabe que entre abril y junio hay una relativa baja oferta del cereal que se cosecha en el país, por lo que este volumen entra a suplir la posible escasez que llegue a presentarse.

Por otra parte, evita que esta llegue para la cosecha nacional del grano, que empieza a recogerse en el mes de julio.

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The Economist: The Americas

Guatemala votes to demand 53% of its neighbour’s territory

Apr 19 2018

IT SOUNDS like an outrageous act of provocation. In a referendum on April 15th, Guatemalan voters chose to file a claim at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) demanding sovereignty over 53% of Belize, their eastern neighbour. The Belizean government, however, responded with congratulations, saying the result “contributes further to the strengthening of democracy, peace and security”. It had reason to be sanguine: the most likely outcome is that nothing will happen.

Guatemala’s demand for a bigger chunk of Central America’s Caribbean coast is far older than Belize itself. In the 1700s Spain agreed to let Britain cut timber in the northern half of modern Belize. Britons searching for mahogany crept southwards. After Spain retreated from Latin America in the 1800s, Britain formally took over the entire territory, naming it British Honduras. The new state of Guatemala said it had “inherited” the region from Spain. Guatemala gave up its claim in 1859, in exchange for Britain...

Anti-elitist politicians in Canada are courting immigrants

Apr 19 2018

EVER since Doug Ford became the leader of Ontario’s centre-right Progressive Conservative Party on March 10th, he has been asked if he is Canada’s Donald Trump. The two have much in common. Big, beefy and blond, Mr Ford inherited a large product-labelling company, yet campaigns against elites who “drink champagne with their pinkies in the air”. He loathes regulation and taxes, and vows to repeal Ontario’s carbon cap-and-trade system. Two books about his late brother Rob, Toronto’s crack-smoking mayor, paint the surviving Ford as impulsive, undisciplined, indiscreet and a bully.

However, the comparison falls apart when it comes to immigration. Mr Ford bemoans the loss of 300,000 manufacturing jobs from Ontario, but blames an incompetent Liberal Party, not foreigners. Far from bashing immigrants, he aims to woo socially conservative ones. For example, he wants to repeal a sex-education curriculum for primary schools that lists six genders and four sexual orientations. Many immigrant parents...

How long will Latin America support “American values”?

Apr 19 2018

THE last time the leaders of 30-odd countries from the Americas met, in Panama in 2015, the presidents of the United States and Cuba, longtime enemies, shook hands. When the group reconvened in Lima this month, the bonhomie was gone. Raúl Castro, who is due to step down as Cuba’s president on April 19th, did not come. His foreign minister, Bruno Rodríguez, attended in his stead and lambasted “United States imperialism”. Donald Trump, who ended the detente with Cuba, stayed home too. He sent his vice-president, Mike Pence, to denounce Cuba’s “despotic regime”. The stand-ins blasted each other with quotations from Latin America’s liberator, Simón Bolívar. Mr Pence: “A people that loves freedom will in the end be free.” Mr Rodríguez: “The United States seems destined by Providence to plague America with torments in the name of freedom.”

Mr Pence probably thought he had won the duel. On the biggest question facing the summiteers—addressing tyranny and hunger in Venezuela—the big countries agreed...